GETTING HIRED – TIME AND EFFORT VERSUS JOB SEARCH RESULTS

Posted on: September 14th, 2011 by
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This insight is called: TIME AND EFFORT VERSUS JOB SEARCH RESULTS
Bill Kaufmann, President of My Greener Future

Experience has shown there’s a big difference between how you approach a job search and the results you get. Some strategies are time consuming but yield little in results. Others can yield opportunity if used appropriately. How do you tell the difference? Your strategy design depends upon your goal.

Let’s look at a representative list and discuss each one in descending order:

#10 – Mail a generic resume and cover letter to everyone and anyone: This approach is the least effective since it’s not targeted and requires the most effort and cost with envelopes, stamps and paper

#9 – Send generic resumes to a blind newspaper ad. Blind ads usually want your email address to sell you something. Newspaper ads are usually local and limited. They’re called “blind ads” for a reason

#8 – A compelling resume and cover letter to targeted recruiters. It’s remote, but possible to match job requirements for a position they may have with your specific experiences, level and price

#7 – Resumes sent to an industry magazine ad. This usually puts you in competition, nationally within your function or industry, unless it’s a regional job or niche market

#6 – Conduct an on-line national search. A large on-line website like Monster.com can give you a sense of what’s available. Do a word match with your resume to the position being considered.

#5 – Geographical, industry or functional on-line search with a targeted resume. Websites by geography, industry or function are more focused and may yield better results.

#4 – Email lists with a targeted resume to known people and companies. After you research industries of interest and their segments, customize your resume to best fit your strengths.

#3 – Person-to-person informational meetings with past and present contacts. Few people will turn you down for a coffee or lunch, asking to learn more about their industry or company.

#2 – Network with indirect referrals from people you know. Once you network with those you know, always ask for referrals for 2 or 3 others. 20 referrals should result from 10 primary contacts. Use the social and business group electronic media at your disposal.

#1 – Network directly with 100 or more of your associates, friends, family and others. They know you best. Prioritize this list. These are your most powerful advocates who can introduce you into potential opportunities or to others. A list of 100 should eventually evolve into 400 to 500 connections.

The power of your job search strategy is directly related to your time and effort cultivating relationships. Each relationship can be critical to your future. A circle of supporters will follow you throughout your career for decades if properly networked with reciprocal support.

Be a candidate rather an applicant. Join us at My Greener Future.

Find more information and mini-webinars at our website: Mygreenerfuture.com


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