What Are Your Chances To Find A Job In Your Field?

Posted on: July 3rd, 2012 by
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Searching for a job...one quarter at a time.

Some really interesting information to ponder.

How easy or difficult is it for recent graduates to find a job?  17% said “very difficult”, 61% said “somewhat difficult”, 18% said “somewhat easy”. (Harvard Institute of Politics, March 23-April 9, 2012)

Another question of recent graduates in the market right after graduation:

  • 24% took a job that was not at all related to their field
  • 11% said the job was not very closely related to their field
  • 26% said it was somewhat closely related
  • 39% said it was very closely related

(Rutgers University Heldrich Center, Workforce Development, 2006 – 2011)

However, in the broader unemployed population instead of the number of job seekers to job openings being 2 to 1 during “normal times”, the ratio of unemployed job seekers to job openings have been 6 to 1 at the height of the recession and is now 4 to 1.

It’s no wonder why you need to ask the question of whether to take the job being offered to you or waiting for a job that is more closely related to your field of interest.

 

Here are a few questions to more clearly frame your answer:

  1. How many job offers are pending or in the pipeline? If you have a few, what’s the risk factor or can you delay your answer to an offer?
  2. How long can you financially wait until the “right” job offer comes along?  Do you have an income source or reserves? How long until you run out?
  3. Do you understand the hiring cycle in your field of interest?  If the heavy season for hiring has just passed, what are your chances?
  4. Of the job being offered, can you segue over to a more compatible job in a year?  If your field is totally different, you’ll need a major change with a new search
  5. Will you have to take a big discount in pay to the average entry pay in your field?  How long will it take to catch-up to where you would have been?
  6. Any idea how many applicants were interviewed as finalist candidates?  How many can do what you do?  How unique are your skills/accomplishments?
  7. Any possibility to move up or over to a more related field within the offering company?  Is the company big enough and growing to need more people?

These are not easy questions.  “A bird in hand” may make the most sense at this time.

 

Get more insights: mygreenerfuture.com. Send questions to: Mygreenerfuture1@cox.net.

 


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