How To Recover From A Termination Of Employment

Posted on: August 28th, 2012 by
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Whatever the cause for a job termination, you only have one of three responses:

Passive, Passive Aggressive or Positive Active.

Some people learn the wrong lessons from a termination and carry their anger with them into the marketplace.  This can be deadly.  Others learn to bounce back quicker. What creates the difference? The greatest determinate is the attitudinal approach toward the future.  What are the three responses and how can they affect your future?

 

Passive: These are the people who give up.  They stay in a shell, make feeble attempts to take control of their destiny, blame others and reject support from those who want to help.  Some reject working for another organization and try their hand at being their own boss.  Success is very low as the entrepreneurial skills are not developed and can drain financial and emotional reserves.  This person needs the most help but is the most difficult.

Passive Aggressive: These are the people who take their anger into the marketplace.  They may lose opportunities with a negative attitude that is just beneath the surface.  Negative energy is most evident when asked, “Why did you leave your last employer?”, or “Tell me about your last job”.  These questions can be turned into a positive if handled well, but will be the death knell of the interview if not handled properly.  Anger is counter-productive.  Since you know the question will be asked, form the best and most credible response beforehand.  Preparation is the key.

Positive Active: These people look at the situation as a transitional opportunity for major positive change.  Now is the time to accelerate, not hit the brakes.  Use your outstanding performance in the past as a springboard.  Create a compelling resume based on transferable skills and results.  Step over the negativism and don’t bring it into the job search.  Plan ahead for the inevitable questions of why you’re in the marketplace, so the hiring manager can see it as an advantage (assuming the separation was not “for cause”).

 

So, how do you succeed during this transition?  Create a persona of competence to project to the hiring organization; Translate your skills and experiences into potential results for the new organization; Believe in yourself and your abilities; Build the confidence to accept the changes that are necessary; Control your own destiny to take positive action; Find creative alternatives to position yourself in the marketplace; Connect with others who are willing to help you; Use your energy in a positive way as you become passionate for a new level of success.

The future has always been in your own hands.  Use your time and effort productively.

 

Get more insights at mygreenerfuture.com.  Send questions to Mygreenerfuture1@cox.net.


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