Don’t Be Fooled: Only Trust an Expert

Posted on: May 10th, 2016 by
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Beware of scams! If you’re looking for a professional to develop a job search strategy for you, write a “master” resume, or prepare you for interviews, you must have a highly competent and experienced pro. There are a lot of phony’s out there. Here are some questions to ask a prospective coach:

First off, you want to know how broad and deep the expertise behind a coach. Questions like:
How long have you been a career coach? (Is it a few months or 20 years?)
How many clients have you worked? (Is it 10 or 200?) What’s your rate of success? (97%)?
What levels, functions and industries have you worked? (Does it cover your goal? Senor, middle and lower levels?) A slick salesperson isn’t really going to help you!
Can you provide me with references from past clients in my field? (Even if you don’t plan to follow-up, what was the response? Maybe you won’t like the answer)

There’s a lot of slick marketing and graphic websites that seem to be all things to all people.
If the material sounds too good to be true, it probably is
Is it someone who is between jobs and looking for some easy cash at your expense?
A true professional wants to help the next talented generation to find a better, higher level job
Amateurs, like a “friend”, neighbor or relative can move you in the wrong direction
If you request information, do you get a barrage of emails and sales material? If you’re contacted more than 2 or 3 times, unsubscribe or tell them to take you off their contact list.

How much should good coaching cost?
I know of a woman who spent $5,000 for a resume that was worthless. I rewrote her resume, designed a job search strategy, improved her interviewing skills and helped negotiate her job offer for under $1500. She is now the senior marketing person for a manufacturing company.
The question is, “What motivates a competent coach?” It should be the value of the service to the client and not the money!

How does it work and when does the coaching stop?
Make sure you’re working with the top professional of the organization and not just a gofer working under the name of the principal
Coaching should stop when you get a new and better job and not before
The coaching process should be continuous until you’re hired
Coaching should include all aspects of the job search strategy, including an entry strategy into the new organization

Lastly, check out the coach’s background and experiences before you even start. Respond to the professional coach directly, not just a website. If you can’t personally talk with the key professional, go somewhere else where you can connect with someone you can really trust.

I’ll provide a FREE assessment of your resume. Send to: wkaufmann44@gmail.com
Help a colleague to find a new job? Refer them to: Mygreenerfuture1@gmail.com


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