RESEARCH FOR YOUR JOB SEARCH

Posted on: August 30th, 2016 by
Comments Requested

 

Here’s some information I found useful in researching job opportunities with my clients in various states and cities. It came from a 24/7 Wall Street article in July, 2016, by Doug McIntyre. It focuses on the total number of unemployed + underemployed by state. Underemployed people are those that are looking for full time work who may be working part time. If you add in those who are no longer receiving unemployment benefits, the percentage number may be much higher than stated.

Unemployed + underemployed = People looking for full time work. The top 10 states, in ascending order of percent, are:

#10 – Illinois 11%

#9 – Connecticut 11.1%

#8 – Oregon 11.1%

#7 – Mississippi 11.2%

#6 – Arizona 11.3%

#5 – West Virginia 11.4%

#4 – California 11.7%

#3 – Alaska 11.9%

#2 – New Mexico 12.4%

#1 – Nevada 13.1%

What surprised me was the top 10 states are not clustered, but are spread out across the U. S. Also, the list represents both large and small states, with only one state from the East Coast.

What does it mean? There are a few insights to this information.

  1. The economy will continue to be affected downward until these numbers begin to reverse
  2. These states may be a drag on their economy. People can’t spend money until they have it
  3. The job market in these states is tight. Your chance to find the right job is limited
  4. Unless you have special skills or have a function in high demand, look elsewhere
  5. The entire East Coast appears to be making the job-opportunity-turn the quickest.

So what do you do?

  1. Research your state to find out where you best fit. (Google: Underemployed in [your state] )
  2. Then research your nearest mid to large city. That will tell you what your chances are and the level of your competition. (Google: Underemployed in [a nearby or targeted city] )
  3. Then research your functional area: Finance, logistics, human resources, marketing, etc.
  4. If you have a subspecialty, dig deeper, like auditing, distribution, recruiting, sales
  5. You should have a pretty good idea about the marketplace when you’re finished.

Then:

  1. Tailor your resume to best fit the opportunities that are lacking potential candidates
  2. Contact recruiters who specialize in your field to see who is hiring for what positions
  3. Ask fellow members of your trade or professional association about the marketplace. If you’re not a member, join one. It’s a direct target for recruiting talent.

The marketplace is vey receptive to new job opportunities. You just need to know where to look.

Want a FREE resume review?  Mygreenerfuture1@gmail.com

Want more information about a coach for you? wkaufmann44@gmail.com


At last you are here. Be bold. Sieze the moment. Be the first to take the opportunity to post a comment here.

We have beeen waiting for you to arrive here to provide your feedback. Now that you are here, go ahead and post a quick note. We would appreciate it.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.